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Saturday, August 19, 1944

Saturday, August 19, 1944

The days that marked the Battle of Normandy

American forces coming from Argentan in the south and the Polish forces coming from Trun to the north make their junction at the level of the village of Chambois. The pocket appears as completely closed, but nevertheless the narrow corridor that stretches from Trun to Chambois is still used by the German soldiers and vehicles to retreat.

The 1st Polish Armored Division moved into the corridor area and took a position on Hill 262 (Mont-Ormel) overlooking the Vimoutiers road, from where it prevented many Axis units from leaving the pocket. The Polish artillery and tanks fired relentlessly on the German columns, which tried to cross the road between Trun and Chambois, which was soon called the “death row”. The air force also bombarded the soldiers folding towards the east.

Since August 16, the pocket where the survivors of the 7th German Army and the 5th Panzerarmee have been surrounded has been reduced by 50%. This impressive progression in four days allows the Allied forces to control the localities of Nécy in the north-west, Putanges-Pont-Ecrépin in the east, Chambois and Le-Bourg-Saint-Léonard in the southeast, Hordousseau in the northeast.
The 2nd French Armored Division advanced east of Argentan and liberated the village of Exmes which became the site of the command post of Colonel Langlade.

Meanwhile, Americans of the 3rd Army, led by General Patton, continued their advance eastwards towards the Seine river, which was reached at the village of Rosny.

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