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HMS Rodney – Battle of Normandy

 HMS Rodney

Index of Allied warships during Operation Neptune

History, technical sheet and photo

Image : HMS Rodney

H.M.S. Rodney history

The battleship 29 H.M.S. (Her Majesty Ship) Rodney was launched on December 17, 1925 and entered service on November 10, 1927. Affected in the Atlantic and along the British coasts, it was damaged on 9 April 1940 near Stavanger by the fall of a Bomb dropped by a German plane but did not explode. After repairs, it patrolled the Channel before being deployed in the Atlantic to escort many convoys.

From 24 May 1941 it took part in the hunting of the German Bismarck warship which it engaged at the dawn of 27 May. It is repaired and modernized in the United States even though the Americans have not yet entered the war.

Deployed in the Mediterranean from September 1941, it participated in Operation Torch in North Africa, the landing of Sicily (Operation Husky) and Operation Avalanche in front of Salerno. In October 1943, it returned to the English Channel and began preparing for its participation in Operation Neptune.

Image : L'HMS Rodney ouvre le feu sur les positions allemandes du secteur de Sword Beach le 6 juin 1944HMS Rodney opening fire on the German positions in the Sword Beach area on 6 June 1944. Photo: IWM

On 6 June 1944, off Sword Beach, it bombarded the battery of Bénerville as well as several German positions in the region of Caen. The day after D-Day, the Rodney collided with the Landing Craft Tank (LCT) 427, resulting in the death of 13 British sailors. Despite this, it  continued his mission and supported the Allied land forces during the continuation of the Battle of Normandy, notably in the area of Carpiquet and Caen, causing great destruction such as the arrow of the Saint-Pierre church.

Image : L'HMS Rodney ouvre le feu sur les positions allemandes du secteur de Sword Beach le 6 juin 1944HMS Rodney opening fire on the German positions in the Sword Beach area on 6 June 1944. Photo: IWM

After Normandy, it continued his escort missions, especially in the North Sea. But, subject to major problems related to the intense use of its engines, it became as of December 1944 the flagship of Home Fleet along the British coasts. Very little used by the Royal Navy, it is finally scrapped as of March 26, 1948.

H.M.S. Rodney technical sheet

Creator/User: Britain
Denomination: 29 – H.M.S. Rodney
Class: Nelson-class battleship

Crew: 1,300 sailors

Armament (1944): 9x 406 mm guns, 12x 152 mm guns, 8x 102 mm guns, 48x 40 mm anti-aircraft pom pom guns, 20x 20 mm anti-aircraft guns

Displacement: 33,900 tons
Speed: 24 knots
Lengths: 216 m
Beam: 32 m
Draught: 10 m

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