Le 504 PIR traverse la Waal

Le front de l'Ouest ne se limite pas à la bataille de Normandie : discutez ici des autres grandes batailles !
Ludoya
Messages : 295
Enregistré le : 12 sept., 23:00

Le 504 PIR traverse la Waal

Message non lu par Ludoya »

Témoignage de Tomas Pitt, S1, 3e bataillon, 504th PIR.
Problems began to develop when elements of the 505th could not seize the bridge across the Waal River in the town of Nijmegen. At that point meanwhile, the British finally came up there. They attempted a frontal assault a couple of times and couldn?t get it. Anyway the plan was thought up then, by someone to send the troops across the river down from the bridge. There was a factory about a mile from where the bridge was and they were gonna have boats and go across in the boats and come up the other side and take the bridge from both sides at once. Then they would have the Krauts trapped between the two forces and they would probably surrender.

The 3rd Battalion of the 504, (our outfit) was selected to be the guinea pigs. So the first thing that was to occur prior to the actual crossing was that we were to get some air cover. British Spitfires (typhoons) that had long range capability were operating (I believe) out of somewhere in France. Finally after some delay, two spitfires came over and started to strafe the opposite banks and on the opposite dike where the Krauts were dug in and all. About the second pass, they (the Germans) got one of the Spitfires and the other one went home. So that was the end of the air cover.

The British had these large tanks; I forget the name of it (Shermans). They were going to give us some artillery fire and first laid down some fire. There were about some eight or ten of them (tanks) that dug in up closer to the bridge from us. They opened fire and they put a lot of iron down in a short period, but in a couple of minutes the (German) counter battery came. I think about four or five of the tanks got hit and the others pulled out.

They then told us to get the boats and go across the river. The boat was like a canvass material with a wood frame to it and it held about twelve men in a boat. We had to paddle to get it across. We took the boats and came from behind the factory (where the Krauts I don?t think knew we were there). We started down across the sandy shore which was maybe 50 yards long till we got to the water. We were running with these boats and our weapons and what not. In addition to all that crap the old man (Major Cook) said you lay a telephone line across the river so when we can talk back to them, if we need support fire or something. We weren?t sure that the radios would work that distance with the one's we had. So I had a kid from the communications section join us with a roll of wire on a spindle-like thing.

We got into the damn boats and thought it at first it looked like rain in the water. Then we realized it was lead coming from the Krauts on the other side. And away we went. I?ll tell you we were paddling like mad to get across. Quite a few of the boats were overturned; guys in a lot of them were killed in the getting across the thing.

When we got over to the other side to the other bank of the water I don?t know how many boats we had lost in the river. It was a hell of a wide river. We got out of the boats. The two guys that where with us, (the two engineers) had to go back to the other side to get some more people. They had a hell of a time getting them back. By then the Krauts weren?t too worried about them. They were more worried about us. We were coming across another beach-like area (200 to 800 yards wide) before the final dike. They were dug in some on the beach and then back in the dike. We were running by them practically and they were just shooting. The only thing to do was to head for the dike because there wasn?t a Goddamed bit of cover anywhere else or anything. So we finally got about half way back to the dike and this kid whose is peeling off this wire and he says "I ran out of wire should I set the phone up here?" I said "hell with it kid just take it easy now and get to the dike. We will talk to them some other day."

So we finally got over to the dike. The Krauts on the other side. The dike must have been maybe ten yards or so wide at the top and they were on the backside. We spent a little time tossing grenades from one side or the other that was fun and games. They were there with their potato mashers and we had fragmentation grenades. So my job was to hold this left flank so as we moved down towards the bridge the Krauts wouldn?t turn and come behind us. So we proceeded to hold it (the dike). The Krauts tried to come across (the dike) a couple times and we discouraged them enough with what lead we gave them. They stayed there. It got a little later on and the first battalion guys came across. We had cleaned out what was on the beach. By then it started getting dark. It was getting late in the day. They (1st Battalion) came over and said they would take the left flank.

Well, I got my guys and we started down around the dike and towards the bridges. Needless to say the sun was coming down. We came to the first bridge and were crossing under was the railroad bridge. Platoon Sergeant Grouse was with me. When I looked up, I could see these guys and I yelled "Hay what outfit are you with?", figuring which company or what outfit was that. Oh man their was a couple of machine guns opened fire on us and we hit the sand and rolled over under the bridge. Grouse looked over at me and said "Lieutenant, I think they might have been from one of the panzer divisions, why did you want to know that?" He got me good on that one. The Krauts where still up on that bridge.

We went on along the dike-like thing, which really was under the bridge and along the other side. In the dark they didn?t bother us. By the time we got to the other side, I guess they didn?t see us or could care less. I think they had their own problems. We got down it must have been another third of a mile or so and came up where the Highway Bridge was across the river. By the time we got there Cook, who was the Battalion Commander was there. And then the first British tanks came roaring across the bridge. They cleaned it out there. Most of H Company (my old company) and G Company and what not came a little shortly afterwards. I don?t know how many of them. Then came a couple of jeeps and what not and there was (General) Gavin, the Division Commander and his radio man They came over in the jeep and came in this house and we had taken over like the command post that was right by the edge of the bridge. They had come in there to get the information and how we were and how the situation was and things like that. We had begun to take some probes out to see what was out in front of us there as from Arnhem. By then, it was dark practically and there came a British staff car along and out got the British commander. He was, I guess. the corp commander. I?m not sure who he was. But one of the wheels and he came on in with his folks with him and what not. (Col.) Tucker was there and (General) Gavin was there and (Major) Cook was there, myself(Lieutenant Pitt) and one of the communications officers. We were sort of in the back ground when you get wheels like that around.

Gavin said "We will put some men up on the tanks and in front of the tanks and lets head for Arnhem." I think it was 20 some miles or so it wasn?t far, you know. This British commander said "We don?t move our tanks at night." Gavin said "You don?t move them at night? Well if we wait till day light then they (the Germans) will move some stuff in." The Brit said "Well we can?t move tanks at night." Gavin said something to him, he said "If they were my men in Arnhem we would move tanks at night. We would move anything at night to get there." This guy said "We are not. We will move them in the morning."*

September 20, 1944

So we had a front out there oh, 500 yards to 1000 yards or more perimeter. Then morning came and that road to Arnhem was nothing but German armor and what not and everything. We got no more got started half way up the road. We didn?t get a couple of miles outside the place and that was it.

But final comments, ? I don?t think that any man that went across that river that day in a boat and were fortunate enough to make the other side will ever in his life forget it. There is no way you can visualize what the devil it was like. I will never forget it and I have had dreams that I am back in the boat and I am paddling like mad.


Ludoya
Messages : 295
Enregistré le : 12 sept., 23:00

Le 504 PIR traverse la Waal

Message non lu par Ludoya »

Traduction. mon anglais étant loin d'être parfait, ne surtout pas hésiter à corriger. Image
Les problèmes sont apparus lorsque les éléments du 505 n'ont pas pu prendre le pont qui traverse la rivière Waal, dans la ville de Nimègue. Les Britanniques sont arrivés. Ils ont tenté un assaut frontal à plusieurs reprises et n'ont pas pu prendre l'objectif. Quoi qu'il en soit le plan a été imaginé par quelqu'un d'envoyer des troupes de l'autre côté de la rivière vers la sortie du pont. Il y avait une usine à environ un mile de l'endroit où le pont se situait. Ils nous ont donné des bateaux et envoyé de l'autre côté pour prendre le pont des deux côtés à la fois. Les "Krauts" seraient coincés entre les deux feux, et ils se rendraient probablement...

Le 3e bataillon du 504 a été choisi pour être les cobayes. Ainsi, la première chose qui allait se produire avant la traversée était une couverture aérienne, c'était garanti ! Les Spitfires anglais (en fait des Typhoon), qui avait un long rayon d'action étaient basés, je crois quelque part en France. Enfin, après un certain retard, deux Spitfires sont venus et ont commencé à arroser la berge et la digue opposées où les "Krauts" ont creusé et tout. A propos de la seconde passe, ils (les Allemands) ont touché un des Spitfires et l'autre rentra à la maison. C'était donc la fin de la couverture aérienne.

Les Britanniques avaient des gros tanks, j'ai oublié leur nom (Shermans ?). Ils allaient nous donner quelques tirs de soutien. Il y avait environ huit ou dix d'entre eux (chars), qui s'était approché au plus près de la passerelle du pont. Ils ont ouvert le feu et envoyé un déluge de fer en très peu de temps, mais en quelques minutes, la contre-artillerie (allemande) est intervenue. Je pense que quatre ou cinq des chars ont été frappé, et les autres se sont retirés.

Ils nous ont dit ensuite de prendre les bateaux et de traverser la rivière. Les bateaux étaient fait de toile avec une ossature de bois et ils pouvaient contenir une douzaine d'hommes. Nous avons dû galérer pour les obtenir. Nous avons pris les bateaux et sommes allés derrière l'usine (où les "Krauts" (?), je ne pense pas qu'ils savaient que nous étions là). Nous avons commencé à descendre à travers la rive sablonneuse qui était peut-être longue de 50 mètres et nous sommes arrivés à l'eau. Nous avons couru avec les bateaux, nos armes et tout le reste. En plus de toutes ces merdes, le "old man" (le Major Cook) nous a dit de poser une ligne téléphonique à travers le fleuve afin de pouvoir parler avec l'autre rive, si nous avons besoin d'appui feu ou quelque chose. Nous n'étions pas sûrs que les radios allaient fonctionner avec la distance. Donc, j'avais un gosse de la section des communications qui s'est joint à nous avec un rouleau de fil de câble.

Nous sommes monté dans ces putains de bateaux et nous avons d'abord pensé que la pluie tombait sur l'eau. Ensuite, nous avons réalisé que c'était du plomb provenant des" Krauts" de l'autre rive. Et nous sommes allés loin. Je vais vous dire, nous avons pagayé comme des fous pour traverser. Un bon nombre de petits bateaux ont été renversés; Beaucoup des gars ont été tués en tentant de traverser.

Quand nous sommes arrivés sur l'autre rive, je ne sais pas combien de bateaux nous avons perdu dans la rivière. Ca a été l'enfer sur le fleuve. Nous sommes sortis des bateaux. Les deux gars qui étaient avec nous, (les deux sapeurs) ont dû retourner de l'autre côté pour prendre un peu plus de monde. Ils retournaient dans un enfer. Maintenant, les "Krauts" avaient d'autres préoccupations. Ils étaient plus préoccupés de nous. Nous étions arrivés sur une large zone de plage (200 à 800 mètres de large) avant la dernière digue. Ils avaient creusés pour certains sur la plage, puis derrière, dans la digue. Nous étions mis à courir directement vers eux, et ils avaient juste à tirer. La seule chose à faire est de se diriger vers la digue, car il n'y avait pas le moindre xxxxxxx d'abris un peu partout, ailleurs, ou quoi que ce soit. Nous avions parcouru environ la moitié du chemin vers la digue, que ce gamin déclare: "je vais manquer de fil, dois-je installer le téléphone ici ?" J'ai dit: "L'enfer est ici, gamin, Tire-toi d'ici et va t'abriter à la digue. Nous parlerons avec eux un autre jour".

Nous avons donc finalement pris la digue. Les "Krauts" de l'autre côté. La digue devait avoir peut-être dix mètres de large nous étions en haut et ils étaient à l'arrière. Nous avons passé un peu de temps à lancer des grenades d'un côté ou de l'autre. Donc, mon travail était de tenir ce flanc gauche de sorte que, quand nous avons bougé vers le pont, les "Krauts" ne tournent pas et viennent derrière nous. Donc, nous avons procédé à la maintenir (la digue). Les Krauts essayé de la reprendre (la digue) une ou deux fois et nous les avons découragés assez vite avec ce que nous leur avons envoyé de plomb. Ils sont restés là-bas. Elle est devenue un peu plus tard la position du premier bataillon et lorsque les gars ont relevé. Nous avions nettoyé ce qui était sur la plage. D'ici là, il se faisait tard, la nuit commençait à tomber. Ils (1er bataillon) sont venus et ont dit qu'ils prendraient le flanc gauche.

Eh bien, j'ai eu mes gars et nous avons commencé à descendre autour de la digue et vers les ponts. Inutile de dire que le soleil était quasi couché. Nous sommes venus à la première passerelle et sommes passé sous le pont ferroviaire. Le sergent de peloton Grouse était avec moi. Quand j'ai levé les yeux, j'ai pu voir ces gars-là et j'ai crié "Hey, quel uniforme avez-vous ?", me demandant quelle compagnie ou quel était cet uniforme. Les hommes était un couple de mitrailleuses ont ouvert le feu sur nous et ont frappé le sable et nous ont renversé sous le pont. Grouse regardant vers moi et dit: "Lieutenant, je pense qu'ils auraient pu être de l'une des divisions de panzer, pourquoi voulais-tu savoir?" ça m'avait semblé bon, sur le coup. Les "Krauts" étaient encore en place sur le pont.

Nous sommes allés sur le long de la digue, ce qui était vraiment sous le pont et le long de l'autre côté. Dans l'obscurité ils ne nous dérangeaient pas. Au moment où nous sommes arrivés de l'autre côté, je pense qu'ils n'ont pas pu nous voir. Je pense qu'ils avaient leurs propres problèmes. Nous avons parcouru un autre tiers de mille environ et sommes venus là où était le pont routier de l'autre côté du fleuve. Au moment où nous sommes arrivés, Cook, qui était le commandant du bataillon était là. Et puis les premiers chars britanniques sont venus rugir sur le pont. Ils ont nettoyé la zone. La plupart de la compagnie H (mon ancienne unité) et la compagnie G sont arrivées un peu peu de temps après. Je ne sais pas combien d'entre eux. Puis, sont arrivées deux Jeeps, il y avait Gavin (général), commandant de la Division, et son radio. Ils sont venus en jeep et sont venus dans cette maison que nous avions installées comme le poste de commandement qui était juste au bord de la passerelle. Ils étaient venus là pour en obtenir des informations et sur la façon dont nous avons procédé, quelle était la situation et des choses comme ça. Nous avions commencé à prendre certaines infos dehors pour voir ce qu'il y avait en face de nous, d'ici vers Arnhem. À ce moment, la nuit était pratiquement tombée et il arriva l'état-major britannique en voiture et il a obtenu le commandement sur le terrain. Il y avait, je pense, le commandant du Corps. Je ne suis pas trop sûr de qui c'était. Une huile et il est venu avec ses copains et je ne sais quoi encore. Le Col. Tucker, le Général Gavin, le Major Cook était là, moi-même (le lieutenant Pitt) et l'un des agents de communication. "We were sort of in the back ground when you get wheels like that around." ?

Gavin a déclaré: "Nous mettrons en place un certain nombre d'hommes sur les chars et devant les tanks et se diriger vers Arnhem." Je pense que c'était à 20 miles ou plus, c'était pas loin, vous savez. Ce commandant britannique a déclaré: "Nous ne faisons pas déplacer nos chars la nuit." Gavin a dit: "Vous ne voulait pas les déplacer la nuit? Eh bien si nous attendons jusqu'à la lumière du jour alors qu'ils (les Allemands) se déplacent" Le Britannique a dit: "Eh bien nous ne pouvons pas nous passer des chars dans la nuit." Gavin a dit quelque chose de lui, il me dit: "Si c'étaient mes hommes, à Arnhem, nous déplacerions les tanks dans la nuit. " Ce mec a dit: "Nous, non. Nous allons les déplacer dans la matinée."

Donc nous avons avancé à quoi ? 500-1000 yards du périmètre et le matin venu, la route pour Arnhem "was nothing but German armor" ou je ne sais quoi. Nous n'avons pas pu faire les quelques kilomètres restant, et c'est tout...

Au final,? je ne pense pas que tout homme qui soit allé à travers la rivière ce jour-là dans une barque et ne l'oubliera jamais.. Il n'y a aucune façon, vous pouvez visualiser ce qu'est le diable, comme il a été. Je ne l'oublierai jamais et j'ai eu des rêves où je suis de retour dans le bateau et je suis en train pagayer comme un fou.
J'ai peut-être pas saisi toutes les subtilités, ne pas se gêner pour me reprendre. Image


Invité

Le 504 PIR traverse la Waal

Message non lu par Invité »

Tu utilises un traducteur en ligne peut être...

Quand il parle de "wheels", ce n'est pas "roue" au sens littéral du terme mais un terme argotique désignant les gradés, les "huiles" dirait on en français...


Ludoya
Messages : 295
Enregistré le : 12 sept., 23:00

Le 504 PIR traverse la Waal

Message non lu par Ludoya »

Non, j'utilise mon traducteur resté bloqué au lycée... Image


Invité

Le 504 PIR traverse la Waal

Message non lu par Invité »

Alors tu t'en sors bien car le texte original n'est pas exactement du Shakespeare Image
Merci pour ce bel effort...


Ludoya
Messages : 295
Enregistré le : 12 sept., 23:00

Le 504 PIR traverse la Waal

Message non lu par Ludoya »

Merci, Gen'.


C'est pour cela que je n'étais pas sûr de certaines subtilités, si tu veux reprendre des passages, ne te gêne surtout pas.

Au passage, voici une photo de Pitt

Image


Invité

Le 504 PIR traverse la Waal

Message non lu par Invité »

Source :
http://www.thedropzone.org/europe/Holland/pitt.html

Une video pas mal foutu (à partir du film a bridge too far...)

http://www.genwi.com/play/1211105

Et les fameux bateaux en toile utilisé par le 3/504 et les ingénieurs du 307...
26 bateaux au total... 16 à l'arrivée... 13 hommes du 3/504 par bateau plus deux engineers du C/307, à découvert face aux flak 20 mm, 88 et autres MG 42... un petit Omaha Beach comme devait dire Julian Cook, CO 3/504....
Image
A voir au musée de la libération à Groesbeek aux pays bas, près de Nimègue...


Demolition man
Messages : 32
Enregistré le : 02 juil., 23:00

Le 504 PIR traverse la Waal

Message non lu par Demolition man »

[quote=gennaker]Et les fameux bateaux en toile utilisé par le 3/504 et les ingénieurs du 307...[/quote]
Juste une remarque : l'équivalent français d'Engineers ( en tant que troupes du Génie ), c'est Sapeurs et non Ingénieurs.


Invité

Le 504 PIR traverse la Waal

Message non lu par Invité »

Merci en passant de ce texte , Bon travail et encore merci


Ludoya
Messages : 295
Enregistré le : 12 sept., 23:00

Le 504 PIR traverse la Waal

Message non lu par Ludoya »

Une carte des opérations de la traversée de la Waal trouvée sur le net.

Image


  • Sujets similaires
    Réponses
    Vues
    Dernier message

Retourner vers « Front de l'Ouest »

Qui est en ligne

Utilisateurs parcourant ce forum : Aucun utilisateur enregistré et 2 invités