Georg Hantusch - Tiger 221

Ce forum vous permet de poser vos questions ou de demander des renseignements concernant les forces allemandes ayant combattu au cours de l'été 1944 en Normandie.
Avatar du membre
weyax
Messages : 203
Enregistré le : 26 oct., 06:44
Localisation : Moselle/Allemagne

Georg Hantusch - Tiger 221

Message non lu par weyax » 15 mai, 10:04

Hallo,

a la recherche du Tigre 221 de Georg Hantusch 2.sSS/101:

Image

Image

je tombais sur l'images suivantes: :ghee:

Image

Image

Source:Military models

A quelqu'un des photos de ce Tigre dans de village Vernon-Vernonette ou même de Tilly à son endroit de décharge ? ?


Image

Vernon-Vernonette??

Image

Merci en avance et

salut



Avatar du membre
weyax
Messages : 203
Enregistré le : 26 oct., 06:44
Localisation : Moselle/Allemagne

Re: Georg Hantusch - Tiger 221

Message non lu par weyax » 15 mai, 13:06

Concerning Tilly-Vernonette I found only an action-report with Tigers mentioned:

It was now nearly dawn on 26th August 1944. We were ordered to form up ready to move towards the bridge. I was in ‘D’ Company, and it was well into daylight before our turn came to cross via the damaged bridge. We crossed in single file with distance between each man, in case of casualties by enemy mortar or small-arms fire. Luckily no action was encountered, although it was a difficult obstacle to negotiate, the way the bridge had fallen.

On arriving on the north side of the bridge at Vernonnet, we found it was badly damaged and still on fire, lots of buildings in a state of collapse. With brick-ends and debris under our feet we moved on down the street to a small church on our left; we moved up the side of this church, through the churchyard, up through the cemetery, over a fence into a small field beyond, which was surrounded by hedges. Suddenly there was an exchange of small-arms fire up ahead. Our 16 Platoon had encountered the enemy. I plainly remember lying in a deep fold in the ground while this was going on. The sun was well up now and rather warm. I must have shown signs of dozing off to sleep when the voice of L/Cpl Whitehouse came from a few yards away to my right, shouting “Dutton, don’t go to sleep, you bloody fool, your life may depend on it!” With that, we were ordered to rise up and go forward on the same axis as 16 Platoon. It was then we could see where the skirmish had been; a German lay dead at the side of the track, his face and front body blown away. He was wearing a stick grenade stuffed in the top of his tunic when fired on by 16 Platoon commander. One bullet exploded the grenade.
It was soon the daybreak of our second day this side of the river Seine (27th August 1944). We had received our orders, which were that we should move to our left onto the road leading to the village of Tilly, to capture the village and hold it! We arrived on the road and formed up ready for the advance, ‘D’ Company leading, 16 Platoon, 17 Platoon, 18 Platoon and so on in line of advance. One section on the right of the road, the other a few yards back on the left, with space between each man. Orders came to start the advance. The road cut between a thickly wooded high slope on the right, falling down to our left with very little visibility on both sides on the road. The leading section of 16 Platoon on the right started their advance. They had not travelled more than 20 - 25 yards, into a slight bend, when it was fired on by a well-concealed machine-gun at a small road junction up the road. This burst of fire scattered the first section, wounding Lieut. Stan Trimnell, his batman and his runner. This sudden attack halted the advance until this weapon had been silenced.

There was still action up in 16 Platoon area; one of the forward sections reported hearing what sounded like tanks, but none could be seen. It was ordered at this point that a small patrol would go up forward on the high ground to investigate. This patrol would consist of a new second lieutenant (W. F. Jennings) who had joined us so recently at the time I did not know his name, platoon Sergeant Sid Potter, and three more men including myself. (The first time, incidentally, that the platoon had been commanded by a commissioned officer since the battle for Mouen; Sgt Potter had been forced to take command because of so many casualties.) So as ordered we proceeded up the right-hand side of the road, the hilly side; on the way we passed one of our 6-pounder anti-tank guns, still limbered up to the carrier awaiting instructions. As I passed, the gun commander L/Sgt Bill Bratt (who was from my home town of Bromsgrove, Worcestershire) said, “Hi, Bromsgrove, how are you? I’ll see you when you come back down.”

Looking out of the woods into the bright sunshine of a field beyond, there no more than fifty yards away was a German Tiger tank. As we all lay in cover looking through the hedge at this monster, two of the crew put out their cigarettes and climbed aboard, as the tank’s engines started up and it started to move along the far hedgerow away from us. The sergeant said to the officer, “It looks like they might be buggering off like his mates have been doing all night, sir.” In reply to this the officer said, “OK then lads, let’s go back down on the road.” With that we scrambled back down to the road below. As we walked back down the road we saw two of our 6-pounder anti-tank guns being deployed on the road, one on the bend, the second one – L/Sgt. Bill Bratt’s gun - on the opposite side of the road further back. During this attack L/Sgt. Bratt was so badly wounded in the face and died of shock the next day.

As I drew level with the first gun, the shouts of the tank alert came from further up the road. It appeared that the tank we had been viewing up on the slope had not decided to “bugger oft” as Sergeant Potter suggested, it was on its way down this road towards us. The gun commander Jack Guest said to me, “Nipper, get down in the ditch by the side of the road, because if I have to fire this gun, the blast will knock you down on your arse.” I promptly did. As the tank rumbled towards us it rounded a bend and was just only half visible when the order came to “Fire”. Pte Tommy Wilkinson on the gun fired its first shell which was a hit; as it wriggled back in the hope of safety more rounds were pumped into it, soon setting it on fire. As the crew bailed out they were dealt with by the lads of 16 platoon.

Image

Seems to be Tiger 221

Image


It was at this stage another German tank appeared in a field by the side of the first tank; there was infantry with this one. It was clear that being on this road at this time was not a nice place to be, as the road and verges were being fired on by the second tank’s small-arms, and there was a lot of shouting from the German infantry up on the high ground. The bullets bounced off the road and ripped up the verges.

The Tiger tank continued down the road shooting up both anti-tank guns and carrier, inflicting many casualties from both gun crew and infantry personnel. In the meantime as we were ordered we clambered up the slope towards the noisy Germans. It was thickly wooded, very close country. It was halfway up the slope that I too was struck by a German bullet, a scalp wound;. This bullet penetrated the front rim of my steel helmet and out through the back rim, running along the side of my head. They don’t come any closer. I was one of 65 casualties from this action. On its progress down the road the second tank knocked out both anti-tank guns, wounding members of both crews and shooting up the carriers that hauled the guns.

Road to Tilly 1944:

Image

and in modern times:

Image


Source: http://www.worcestershireregiment.com/w ... d_t_dutton


salut



OGefr. Habersack
Messages : 111
Enregistré le : 09 oct., 19:50

Re: Georg Hantusch - Tiger 221

Message non lu par OGefr. Habersack » 15 mai, 20:42

Hallo Weyax,

voici une photographie du Tiger 221 appartenant à la deuxième section de la deuxième compagnie de la schwere SS-Panzer Abteilung 101 détruit par plusieurs coups de face de 6 pounder le 27 août 1944 au sud de Tilly, sur la rive droite de la Seine. La même que l’une de celles que vous avez entre temps posté !

Aucun membre d’équipage n’aurait survécu d’après le compte-rendu britannique. Or, le chef de char du 221, le SS-Untersturmführer Georg Hantusch, commandera un Tiger II pendant la bataille des Ardennes...

Image

Bien à vous.
Amicalement.
Lionel.
Modifié en dernier par OGefr. Habersack le 16 mai, 07:26, modifié 1 fois.



Avatar du membre
weyax
Messages : 203
Enregistré le : 26 oct., 06:44
Localisation : Moselle/Allemagne

Re: Georg Hantusch - Tiger 221

Message non lu par weyax » 16 mai, 06:58

Hallo Lionel!

Un merci pour votre reponse avec un pic out of "better" times:

Image


Yes, Hantusch was commander of a 221 TigerII in Peipers Column and wounded at Werimont-Farm.

Salut



jeepdodgedu78
Messages : 134
Enregistré le : 25 août, 19:42
Localisation : yvelines / calvados

Re: Georg Hantusch - Tiger 221

Message non lu par jeepdodgedu78 » 16 mai, 19:21

bonjour

je travail a Vernon , et j ai jamais entendu parle de ce char , de plus c est pas Vernonette mes Vernonnet


attention c 'est moi qui tiens l'aiguille

Avatar du membre
weyax
Messages : 203
Enregistré le : 26 oct., 06:44
Localisation : Moselle/Allemagne

Re: Georg Hantusch - Tiger 221

Message non lu par weyax » 17 mai, 05:35

On ne finit jamais l'enseignement! :mrgreen:

Salut




  • Sujets similaires
    Réponses
    Vues
    Dernier message

Retourner vers « Forces allemandes »

Qui est en ligne

Utilisateurs parcourant ce forum : Aucun utilisateur enregistré et 2 invités